Harvesting is well under way so roads have been busy with tractors, trailers and combine harvesters.  Moving From field to field and farm to farm as farmers and contractors race to bring in crops. So different from late spring when farmers were bringing in straw and hay from England and France to feed their stock. In the walled garden, seeds initially slow to germinate, saw growth ‘take off’ as the hot weather arrived in June. In July and August growth accelerated at a rate not seen for several years.The garden has raced through summer resulting in an early harvest of onions, shallots,  beans and peas. Jam and chutney making has been going on alongside our main priority, welcoming guests.

Runner beans and leeks in the walled garden.

Runner beans, red cabbages and leeks in the walled garden.

Herbaceous border in full bloom.

Herbaceous border in full bloom.

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Mushrooms growing under an old oak tree.

Mushrooms growing under an old oak tree.

Preparing for the Fair

Warwick picking peppers in the greenhouse.

Warwick picking tomatoes and peppers in the greenhouse.

Warwick and his tomatoes. From Seed to Fork!

Warwick and his tomatoes. From Seed to Fork!

Multyfarnham Country Fair

Multyfarnham Country Fair was held this past weekend.This year it was a two-day event, with Talent and Cake Competitions running alongside the sale. The stall-holders were very grateful for the cover provided by the new marquees, as on Saturday, it was very wet. Musicians and dancers entertained the crowd under cover, and sales were brisk.

Sunday by contrast dawned sunny and warm. We were up before the dawn chorus. It  wakes us later these mornings as we are over the cusp of summer. The crowds came and were certainly prepared to buy our jams, chutneys and beans. The advertising campaign had featured scarecrows at strategic locations beside the roads of Co. Westmeath. Some were on display at the fair itself. The hard-working committee members are certainly to be congratulated for the success of the fair.

Multyfarnham Country Fair '13 010

competion

Taking a break at Multyfarnham Country Fair.

Sales force ready for action

Sales force ready for action.

Toadstools for sale at the fair.Taste before you purchase is a good motto!

ot sure who this is meant to be. Do you know?

Not sure who this is meant to be.                   Do you know?

Multyfarnham Country Fair '13 014

Our own 'Best customers?'

Our own ‘Best customers’?

Runner beans'13 003                   Red admiral and peacock butterflies taking advantage of late summer sun.

Noddy and Holly munching on windfall apples.

Noddy and Holly munching on windfall apples.

We use peppers and other vegetables in the a dish of  couscous. It is very tasty and goes down well with guests, friends and family. A useful dish for entertaining.

Cous cous Mornington style

Cous Cous – Mornington style

Cous Cous Allow 250gm / 1 cup for two people

Water 375ml/ 1 ½ Boiling water and other liquid*

1-2                     Shallots-finely chopped

1-2                     Cloves of garlic-crushed

1                         Chilli Peppers, de-seeded and finely chopped

1 Centre of head of celery-Remove outer stalks from head.(retain for stock or other uses)

1-2 Tbsp            Turmeric ground

Olive Oil

Butter

1                         Orange rind and juice*

1                         Lemon rind and juice*

1                         Lime rind and juice*

Small bunch Coriander fresh -snipped

½ Red Pepper, De-seeded and finely diced

½ Green Pepper, De-seeded and finely diced

Dried Apricots  ½ cup cut into strips

Dried cranberries ¼ cup

Dried blueberries ¼ cup

Salt & black pepper

Cashew nuts toasted or browned in a little butter and olive oil, then chopped.

Method

  1. In a small sauté pan sauté shallots and garlic in a little olive oil and butter, until golden brown.
  2. Add turmeric and continue to fry for 3-5 min. until raw taste has gone.

.*May need a little more oil.

  1. Add orange juice, lime juice and lemon juice to make a smooth paste.
  2. Add boiling water to couscous a little at a time until ½ the amount has been absorbed.
  3. Add turmeric / juice mix and stir into cous cous until well combined.
  4. Add remaining water.
  5. Add chopped vegetables, dried fruit and herbs.
  6. Adjust seasoning as needed

If you were offered a ticket to go to an Olympic event, which event would you choose?

No 1 hubbie aka Warwick chose ….. Beach volleyball!

So whilst great jollifications were had on Horse Guards Parade, back in the garden the marrows and courgettes were getting bigger, the mangetout and beans needed picking, tomatoes and peppers in the greenhouse were being overrun by  weeds. whilst those in the garden were in ‘take-over’ mood. Then to cap  it all, we both took a brief break to catch up with family  in England. So weeds took over the garden!!!

Whilst in England we took the opportunity to visit some properties once owned by W’s great, great grandfather. One is now a business centre and the other a housing estate.

A summer’s day or The Irish get everywhere.

Picture a typical hot summer’s day in an English village, even the duck’s are taking a rest. A sign in front of the ancient church saying, “Cream teas from 3-6pm” Who can resist the next cup of tea? Ignoring the pub lunch eaten just two hours before, in marched the men! Needless to say we followed. Or at least I was pulled up the path and pushed into the  cool of the ancient interior. We are welcomed by other participants. Pews had been turned to allow tables to be set up. Inevitably we are asked where we are from. My husband’s reply” Ireland”, elicited an exclamation  and response of “So are we”! from two ladies at the same table.

Animated conversation followed. One lady had been a music teacher at Mercer’s school. (one of the schools which had been subsumed into King’s Hospital School.)  I mentioned that I had worked at Wilson’s Hospital School; the same lady asked whether Jimmy McKeon was still alive. The lady in question had taught ‘little Jimmy’ to play the piano. The ladies were Mrs Rachel Young and Mrs Agnes Curtis

Cream Tea

Cream Tea on a sunny Sunday afternoon

 The ducks from the village pond were snoozing

Ducks snoozing on a sunny afternoon

Ducks snoozing on a sunny afternoon

As Mornington and it’s garden have been been whipped back into shape so we are beginning the annual round of jam and chutney making. A friend advised us to dig the whole potato crop to avoid damage by worms.

Cutting tomatoes for chutney

2012 crop of potatoes

2012 crop of potatoes in Nocholas Moss bowl.

2012 potatoes in Stephen Pearse bowl

2012 potatoes in Stephen Pearse bowl

Potato Soup

5-6 large Potatoes

Centre of head of celery – roughly chopped

2-3 Onions – diced

2-3 Leeks (if available) – cut up

Chopped Parsley

2 litres Chicken stock

Cream

Salt & pepper

Method

  1. Bake potatoes in moderate oven or cook in micowave oven
  2. Cut potatoes in half lengthwise
  3. Scoop cooked flesh out of potato with a spoon or melon baller.* *Keep potato skins and flesh separately.
  4. Sauté onions and celery heart until soft but not brown.
  5. Add cooked potato flesh and chicken stock.
  6. Simmer for 5-10 minutes.
  7. Add chopped parsley and chives.
  8. Process with soup gun or food processor until smooth
  9. Season to taste and adjust consistency.

Meanwhile, back in the garden the marrows have been picked and will be made into chutney and pickles.

Courgettes and marrows

Courgettes and marrows heading to the kitchen

Tomatoes grown in the greenhouse some chopped for chutney. The cherry tomatoes cut, brushed with olive oil and dried for salad and pizza toppings.

Preparing tomatoes for chutney and relish